Roy Lichtenstein in studio standing front 4 of his geometric pop-art figure artworks and a banana artwork hanging on a white wall for 1987 Luna Luna park.

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein designed exterior panels for a glass labyrinth. Each side of his Luna Luna Pavilion follows the logic from his 1985 “Perfect/Imperfect” painting series. 

Artist

Roy Lichtenstein

Attraction

Luna Luna Pavilion

Born

1923, USA

Lichtenstein was a key figure in the Pop Art movement in New York in the 1960s

He used Ben-Day dots, a dot screen method used to increase the tonal range in commercial printing

He worked with primary colors to replicate the colors of newspapers and comic strips

Fairground view: Roy Lichtenstein, Luna Luna Pavilion. Luna Luna, Hamburg, Germany, 1987.

View of artist Roy Lichtenstein working in his studio
Roy Lichtenstein.

One of the most celebrated artists of the twentieth century, Roy Lichtenstein made paintings and prints based on found imagery—such as the covers of generic romance books, war comics, and advertisements, as well as architecture, design, and art historical sources—treating all images, high or low, equally. Lichtenstein was a leading figure in establishing the Pop Art movement in 1960s New York, alongside artists such as Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, and Jasper Johns.

Lichtenstein was a leading figure in establishing the Pop Art movement in 1960s New York, alongside artists such as Claes Oldenburg, Andy Warhol, and Jasper Johns.

Roy Lichtenstein, Luna Luna Pavilion, exhibited 1987.

Roy Lichtenstein.


Mimicking the mechanical production of comic books, Lichtenstein transferred source imagery to canvas with a projector and reproduced it with paint using Ben-Day dots—the method used by newspapers and comic strips to denote gradients, texture, and heighten contrast. His inaugural Pop work, Look Mickey (1961), borrows a scene from the Disney children’s book, Donald Duck: Lost and Found (1960) and replicates its primary colors, heavy black outlines, and bubble text to create an instantly recognizable visual language.

Roy Lichtenstein, André Heller.
Roy Lichtenstein.

While he retained a lifelong interest in mass media, Lichtenstein abandoned working with comics in the mid-1960s, choosing to reflect on art history. Lichtenstein’s “Perfect/Imperfect Paintings” are a radical series of abstract compositions that use a single black line to self-generate geometric planes. The resulting paintings use intersecting triangles, black diagonal lines, signature dots, and flat planes of primary colors to experiment with and parody the visual and spatial boundaries of the two-dimensional plane.

Fairground view: Roy Lichtenstein, Luna Luna Pavilion. Luna Luna, Hamburg, Germany, 1987.

For Luna Luna, he designed exterior panels for a glass labyrinth. Each side of his Luna Luna Pavilion follows the logic from his 1985 “Perfect/Imperfect” painting series. The pavilion’s interior features a mirrored glass labyrinth designed by André Heller’s team and music by Philip Glass, preceding Lichtenstein and the American composer’s collaboration for their 1991-92 music box, Modern Love Waltz.

All Lichtenstein works © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein, 1986-1987, all rights reserved.

Forgotten Fantasy

Los Angeles, CA
Now open! Now open!

Thirty-six years ago, Luna Luna landed in Hamburg, Germany: the world’s first art amusement park with rides, games, and attractions by visionaries like Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, and David Hockney. By a twist of fate, the park’s treasures were soon sealed in 44 shipping containers and forgotten in Texas—until now.