Patrick Raynaud smiling while touching his metallic and black Playground of geometric sculptures for 1987 Luna Luna park.

Patrick Raynaud

Patrick Raynaud’s contribution to the 1987 Luna Luna park was the Playground of Geometric Sculptures

Patrick Raynaud designed a playground of contorted and precariously balanced architectural and geometric forms that represented a demented cityscape.

Artist

Patrick Raynaud

Attraction

Playground of geometric sculptures

Born

1946, France

Raynaud creates large-scale installations that reimagine public space

He questions the movement of art through institutions by using shipping containers and crates in his work

His work includes reproductions of artworks by iconic artists, including Leonardo da Vinci, Vincent van Gogh, and Claude Monet

Patrick Raynaud.

Fairground view: Patrick Raynaud, Playground of geometric sculptures. Luna Luna, Hamburg, Germany, June-July, 1987.

Patrick Raynaud creates films and sculptures, taking seemingly mundane objects—from active machines such as wind turbines or roundabouts to static crates and mannequins, and transforming them into playfully provocative sculptures.

Patrick Raynaud, Preparatory sketches for playground of geometric sculptures, exhibited 1987.

Fairground view: Patrick Raynaud, Playground of geometric sculptures. Luna Luna, Hamburg, Germany, June-July, 1987.

Since the 1980s, crates have been a central element of Raynaud’s work. Crates—both ubiquitous and overlooked objects within the contemporary art market—allow art to be shipped and moved at a global scale. Raynaud’s sculptures explore the conditions of the commercial art ecosystem by transforming these mobile units into art objects themselves. He frequently adorns crates and containers with photographic reproductions of art historical masterworks, investigating the circulation of high-value works such as Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa (1503). Other works by Raynaud reimagine institutionally and commercially sacred artworks, Claude Monet’s Water Lilies (1897-99) or Vincent van Gogh’s Sunflowers (1888-89), in the form of light boxes or postcards—a form of appropriation that questions the difference between original and copy and democratizes the consumption of these iconic images.

Raynaud’s sculptures explore the conditions of the commercial art ecosystem by transforming these mobile units into art objects themselves.

Patrick Raynaud, Playground of geometric sculptures, exhibited 1987.

Patrick Raynaud, Playground of geometric sculptures, exhibited 1987.

For Luna Luna, Raynaud designed a demented cityscape comprising a series of contorted and precariously balanced architectural and geometric forms. Homes are stacked and flipped upside down, stairs lead to nowhere, and shapes are illuminated from within by ghostly interior lights. Raynaud makes these otherwise innocuous forms and architectures uncanny, crafting a whimsical dystopia with his gravity-defying installation.

Fairground view: Patrick Raynaud, Playground of geometric sculptures. Luna Luna, Hamburg, Germany, June-July, 1987.

Discover more about your favorite artists and attractions

In the original Luna Luna book, translated and reissued for the first time since 1987.