Jörg Immendorff standing in front of his poster for his shooting gallery holding two paper gold butterflies and a shotgun for 1987 Luna Luna park.

Jörg Immendorff

Jörg Immendorff’s contribution to the 1987 Luna Luna park was the Shooting Gallery with Political Imagery

Jörg Immendorff created flags, a poster, and a shooting gallery game. He painted its facade, outfitting it in nightmarish murals depicting Germany’s recent past.

Artist

Jörg Immendorff

Attraction

Shooting gallery game with political imagery

Born

1945, Germany

Immendorff is known for his colorful and chaotic paintings that address the political climate of Postwar Germany

He studied under Joseph Beuys at the Düsseldorf Art Academy before being expelled for his work as a political organizer

In addition to painting, Immendorf has designed stage sets and costumes as well as large-scale public installations

Jörg Immendorff, Shooting gallery with political imagery, exhibited 1987.

Jörg Immendorff, Shooting gallery with political imagery, exhibited 1987.

Jörg Immendorff created large-scale paintings with political imagery that explore the tensions of postwar Germany. After being expelled from the Düsseldorf Art Academy for his political organizing, in 1968 Immendorff founded the “LIDL Academy,” a creative space named after baby talk and the sound of a baby’s rattle, poking fun at institutional elitism and the notion of artistic genius.

Jörg Immendorff, Shooting gallery with political imagery, exhibited 1987.

Jörg Immendorff, Shooting gallery with political imagery, exhibited 1987.

Immendorff began his renowned Café Deutschland series (1978-82) in the late 1970s: a series of 16 large-scale paintings influenced by Italian painter Renato Guttuso’s Caffè Greco (1976). Referencing the cabaret culture of prewar Berlin, these paintings use nightclubs as a staging ground for political and cultural scenes featuring figures as disparate as Adolf Hitler, Otto Dix, and Max Beckmann. Colorful, chaotic, and elaborately staged, they merge autobiography with social and political commentary to consider the division between East and West Germany in the decades following World War II. In addition to oil painting on canvas, Immendorff worked on stage sets and costumes for the Salzburg Festival and created a number of public sculptures.

Fairground view: Jörg Immendorff, Shooting gallery with political imagery. Luna Luna, Hamburg, Germany, June-July, 1987. 

Fairground view: Jörg Immendorff, Shooting gallery with political imagery. Luna Luna, Hamburg, Germany, June-July, 1987. 

Immendorff created flags, a poster, and a shooting gallery outfitted with outsize, nightmarish depictions of Germany’s recent past. In one of the paintings, a Reichsadler, or German Imperial Eagle (a symbol of national pride tainted by Nazi usage), pushes a wheelbarrow full of pallid bodies onto a cabaret stage. Hovering over the near-empty theater, a sign gesturing to the emptiness of German national identity reads “babel marke vaterland,” or “babel brand fatherland,” above a destroyed bicycle. Inside, visitors shot at cups in an act of annihilation echoing the wreckage of postwar Germany.

Jörg Immendorff, Shooting gallery with political imagery, exhibited 1987.

Discover more about your favorite artists and attractions

In the original Luna Luna book, translated and reissued for the first time since 1987.